Idaho States Quarter


From the years of 1999 to 2008 the United States Mint released a series of State Quarters to the United States. Each quarter had its own unique design. In an effort to offer new coins for the next generation of collectors the United States Mint started the program. The program was a great success and made history for being the numismatics most successful program. The coins were released 10 weeks apart, leading to 5 quarters a year. Each quarter was released based on the order their state entered into the union. For example, Delaware became a colony on December 7, 1787. The State Quarters Program was first presented and approved by President Clinton in 1997. The Public Law was presented by Congressman Michael Castle and supported by David L. Ganz.

Out of all the coins that were made by the United States Mint there are approximately 147 million Americans that collected the coins for all 50 states which are one member of a household on average. The quarters are not only made for the generation of collectors but have served as a precious tool for education in regards to history and geography in all the states. According to U.S. Mint, six million free lesson plans have been downloaded from their website by teachers, parents, and students.

The first coin made for the program was produced in 1999 and was the first change to the circulating coin since the 1976 Bicentennial coin designs. The highest made coin was the 2000 Virginia Quarter and the lowest was the 2008 Oklahoma coin.

In the ten years that the program ran there were over thirty-four billion, State Quarters made for circulation. In the previous ten years, the production for quarters was fourteen billion quarters. All the coins that were made during for the program in the years 1999 to 2008 presented over $6.1 billion in seigniorage.

Out of all the 50 State Quarters program, the only state that had two Cabinet Secretaries along with the Director of the United States Mint to help celebrate the state quarter was Idaho. The Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of the Interior, and Director of the United States Mint all praised the quarter. The State of Idaho was represented by the State Treasurer at the ceremony that was held at the Boise Depot. The ceremony also President of the Peregrine Fund and Larry Gebert the weatherman of KTVB-TV. At the end of the amazing ceremony Secretary Paulson, Secretary Kempthorne, Director Moy, and State Treasurer Crane all handed out shiny brand new quarters to all the kids in the crowd. The adults in the area lined up and grabbed a new roll of Idaho quarters in exchange for $10 bill.

Out of all the coins that were made by the United States Mint there is approximately 147 million Americans that collected the coins for all 50 states which is one member of a household on average. The quarters are not only made for the generation of collectors but have served as a precious tool for education in regards to history and geography in all the states. According to U.S. Mint, six million free lesson plans have been downloaded from their website by teachers, parents, and students.

Idaho entered the union in 1890 and so it was released as the forty-third coin in the State Quarter series. The Idaho quarter was the third to be released in 2007, Jun 4, 2007, to be exact. On the back side of the Idaho Quarter, you will see a Peregrine Falcon with the inscription of the State name, the date the state became a state, the mintage date, the state motto "Esto Perpetua," and "E Pluribus Unum" which means "In God We Trust." The design of the back side was done by Don Everhart and Donna Weaver was the individual that engraved the coin.

The Peregrine is the fastest bird in the world and use to be on the endangered list but was brought back by the Boise Peregrine Fund. The main question many ask is why is it on the back side of the Idaho State Coin as it is not the State Bird. Many know Idaho for its potatoes or its wilderness areas and each one of these would have been a grand idea of the back of the quarter so again why the Peregrine? Well over 1,200 designs were submitted for Idaho. The Idaho Commission of the Arts narrowed it down to the top ten which were then sent over to Idaho's then-Governor Dirk Kempthorne. Governor Kempthorne limited it down to the top five and narratives for their designs. The finalists were the Peregrine Falcon, the tapestry of farmland, and the lyrics to the state song.

Governor Dirk Kempthorne had the final say in the selection and selected the Peregrine Falcon from the finalist. There is no significance to Idaho as the falcon can be found almost anywhere in the wild all over the world and is on every continent but Antartica. If you are looking for a specific reason for the design of the peregrine being chosen we can look to the peregrine conservation organization that found its home in Idaho. Idaho has been credited for doing a ton of work to rescue the American Northwest Peregrine Falcon home and population.

In the bottom right hand corner of the back side you will see the outline of the State with a star at the location of the State Capitol which is Boise. Idaho is a word from the Native Americans meaning "gem of the mountain;" however, this was discovered to be most likely a joke proven by scholars. Until this date, we still do not know the origin of the word Idaho.

After the overall program success of the Quarters Program other coins have been redesigned, for example, the Westward Journey Nickel series, the Presidential Dollar series and a few others. Another event that happened after the completion of the State Quarters series was the District of Columbia along with the United States Territories Quarters Program.